A Tribute to Jean Chabot

The best thing about rug hooking is the wonderful hookers you get to know…. and one of the best things for me about hooking has been becoming friends with Jean Chabot. She’s not only a terrific hooker…but a wonderful person as well…and I have learned so much by just looking over her shoulder.

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This primitive pillow was from a workshop on combining penny rugs (applique) and hooking, taught by Bea Grant.

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Jean is a certified  rug hooking teacher,…and one of her students loved that pillow and wanted to hook it. Jean explained that it wasn’t her pattern, so she couldn’t reproduce it…but ever resourceful…she designed this ‘leaf’ rug using the same techniques , and did it along with the one her student did.

After retiring as a school teacher, Jean, who was a painter, knitter and weaver, wanted to learn how to do rug hooking…and fortunately met up with Linda Wilson. She recounts how in her first class, Linda gave them a piece of burlap with the edges marked and the centre blank. She then told her to ‘draw something’ , and  left her alone to figure it out. At first she was stymied, but..she ended up drawing a pansy, and then Linda helped her with the colour selection and hooking. She says it is a lousy pansy, but she is forever grateful to Linda for letting her struggle with that first design. It took away the ‘mystique’ and she has been designing many of her patterns since then.

One of her early rugs, a fine cut  “Annabelle”.  Jean dyed the wool and did a herringbone whipped edge.

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Jean never shies away from a challenge…look at all  these round and oval rugs…I still have not tackled one.

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This is one of a set of chair pads from her kitchen.

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This beautiful circular fine cut was done as a requirement for becoming a certified rug hooking teacher.

Another beautiful pillow: Luise Bishop gave a course on creative stitches for hooking, and Jean incorporated them here..

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She has a beautiful intarsia sweater, and replicated the pattern from it with hooking in a variety if stitches. (she brought the sweater so we could see it too, but somehow I missed getting a picture of it….dar n!) Isn’t that stunning!

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This fanciful star pillow was done in a course with Ann Hallett. She used Ann’s templates…the largest star represents her husband Serge.

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This native design was done in a course at Trent with Germaine James.

Jean became interested in the Caribbean mola designs, and on her own, designed and hooked the turtle piece. Others at Sunshine Rug hookers became interested in this style, and the group had Betty Lane come and give a course on the style.

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The larger piece was a result of the class…Jean said she used the Gieko Gecko (from the ads) as her inspiration for the lizard….love the colours in those cute guys.

Jean enjoys the effect of hooking with plaids…and used them in these funny ‘chicken jokes.

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Jean says these are just put away in a drawer…I might just sneak them into my kitchen. I think they are so funny!

Deanne Fitzpatrick has been an important influence with many of the Sunshine hookers. One year…12 of them made the trip to Nova Scotia to take a course with her.

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Jean’s Deanne inspired piece incorporates both mohair and silk.

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This piece was intended to be stained glass and  have birds or butterflies, but when Jean saw the foliage…it said ‘sea weed’ to her….so she made it an underwater scene.

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These colourful birds are done with nylons which she dyed herself. I apologize for the glare….it is framed under glass…and that’s the best this non-photographer could manage.

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This is a more traditional stained glass piece, which she designed and hooked for her mom.

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Jean and her husband love the Gaspe, and have visited  several times. Jean hooked this piece from her photo (shown above) while taking  a pictorial class at Trent with Marjorie Judson.

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This is Hamish. Another year at Trent…Jean was enrolled in a class with Jon Ciemiewicz, and knew she wanted to hook a big animal. She was inspired by a calendar photo she saw, and started by doing the pencil drawing, and then hooking it. I think Hamish is my favourite!

….well this bag runs a close second….

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This beautiful tote bag was inspired by an article and pattern in RHM. Jean wanted a very specific style of leather handles for it, and it took her over a year to locate and get them. Well worth the wait. The inside is lined with a tiger print. This is SOOO beautifully finished.

March 2011, Jen Manuell gave a workshop on her beautiful matrix designs, and this is Jean’s interpretation.

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Purple isn’t a colour she usually uses, but it is wonderful here. She is so clever with the colours she puts together. I admire her patience in finding just the right combination.

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…an intricate proddy brooch…(in Jean’s more usual colour palette)

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This three dimensional bird ornament is just beautiful. Linda Wilson gave a workshop on how to make them and I am so impressed with Jean’s…unfortunately mine is still in pieces in a bag. I can happily work on a 3′ x 6′ rug…but something tiny frustrates me to no end…sigh…

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This is Jean’s current small piece in progress. She picked up this pattern at one of our recent fund raising sales/auctions but hasn’t yet done the background. It looks as if it could fly off the fabric.

Thanks Jean for sharing  your beautiful work….and no less for your ongoing friendship and support.

3 thoughts on “A Tribute to Jean Chabot

  1. Beautiful work! I adore Hamish too, but I love the sky in her water photo pictorial. Such a nice variety of work! Thanks for sharing Jean’s lovely creations with us!

  2. Oh my, Jean’s work is simply wonderful. I don’t believe I’ve seen it before. Her Gaspe piece and Hamish are my favourites. Thanks for showing us.

  3. I agree Miz T and Jill…I’ll pass your comments on to Jean, I know she’ll be pleased that you enjoyed her work..

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